Recipes and starter care

Sourdough pizza

Let dough come to room temperature in its plastic packaging, at least one hour and up to four hours. Your pre-shaped dough has been cold proofing, so it’s ready to stretch once it no longer feels cold to the touch and has relaxed to fill its container to the edges. *To defrost frozen dough or bring dough to room temperature in colder months*: We recommend pulling your dough straight from the freezer and placing it in your turned off oven with a pot of boiling water for about 2 hours. You can also do this to bring your refrigerated dough to room temperature if it's cold in your kitchen.

Preheat your oven to it’s highest temperature, at least 475 - 500 F. Add a baking stone/steel or an upside down baking sheet to serve as your heated baking surface.

Use any flour to dust all sides of your dough, your hands, and your work surface. Gently stretch your dough to about 10-12” in diameter.

Add your toppings.

Slide your dough onto a floured pizza peel or upside down baking sheet and transfer it to your oven. If you’re worried about your dough sticking, use a sheet of parchment paper between your dough and your peel or baking sheet, and slide your pizza into your oven with the parchment paper beneath it.

Bake until your dough is golden brown, with some darker spots, This will depend on your oven, but should be around 10 minutes. If one side is darker than the other, rotate your dough to evenly cook on all sides.

Quail Street's irresistible garlic knots

1 pizza dough yields 12 garlic knots

Ingredients

1 head of garlic
1/4 cup of salted butter, melted
Pinch of onion powder 
Pinch of garlic powder
Parmesan cheese to garnish

Instructions

Let dough come to room temperature in its plastic packaging, at least one hour and up to 4 hours in colder temperatures. Your pre-shaped dough has been cold proofing, so it’s ready to stretch once it no longer feels cold to the touch. It won’t rise more until you bake it.

Preheat your oven to 485 F. Prepare a baking sheet with a layer of parchment paper.

Finely mince the garlic and add to your melted butter along with onion and garlic powder.

Use any flour to dust all sides of your dough, your hands, and your work surface. Cut your dough in to four equal portions, then cut each quarter into three portions, gently stretching each portion as needed to get an even shape.

Dip each portion in flour and gently stretch with your hands to get a rope that you can tie into a knot.

Place your knot onto the prepared baking sheet. Repeat for all portions of dough.

Brush all garlic knots with the garlic butter mixture

Place tray into the oven and bake until garlic knots are golden brown with some darker spots, about 15 - 20 minutes depending on your oven.

Remove garlic knots from the oven, brush with garlic butter mixture again, then top with freshly shaved parmesan.

Sourdough hand pies

1 pizza dough yields 4 hand pies

Assembled hand pies can be frozen and baked straight from the freezer!

Instructions

Let dough come to room temperature in its plastic packaging, at least one hour and up to 4 hours in colder temperatures. Your pre-shaped dough has been cold proofing, so it’s ready to stretch once it no longer feels cold to the touch. It won’t rise more until you bake it.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees

Use any flour to dust all sides of your dough, your hands, and your work surface. Cut your dough in to four equal portions.

Gently stretch one portion of dough (using more flour as needed to prevent sticking) into a rectangular shape, and then stretch all sides as far as they will go without tearing. Your dough may be somewhat translucent in the middle — this is ok and will give you a thin, crispy crust. If the dough does tear, use a bit of water to pinch the hole back together.

Add a generous spoonful of fillings to the bottom half of the dough, then fold over the top half to form a hand pie. Pinch, fold, or crimp the seam to close.Trim excess dough as needed.

Repeat steps 4-5 for all portions of dough.

Brush the outside of each hand pie with egg wash, butter, or your choice of alternative.

Bake at 450 degrees for about ten minutes or until golden brown. Alternatively, you can freeze unbaked hand pies and bake straight from the freezer. We recommend placing each layer of hand pies on a sheet of parchment paper to keep them from sticking.

Sourdough starter 101

About sourdough starter

Your sourdough starter is a living colony of yeast and bacteria—which is pretty neat! It's always changing and adapting. And depending on lots of factors, like the ambient temperature, the temperature of the water and flour you add to it, and how much flour and water you feed it, it may be more or less active.

Below, we provide very basic instructions for keeping your starter alive. However, the best way to care for your starter is to learn to interpret its behavior.

To do this, it helps to understand the lifecycle of your starter, which is restarted every time you feed it flour and water: 

Your starter thrives on flour and water. As it digests the nutrients in flour and water, it will create air bubbles. Those air bubbles get trapped in the gluten structure of your dough, and that's what creates an open crumb and rises your bread.

Once your starter has digested all the nutrients in the flour and water, it will go into anaerobic activity, which means it will no longer create air bubbles. 

You can slow down the metabolism of your starter and delay the onset of anaerobic activity by placing your starter in the fridge. This means you want to move your starter to the fridge after it's started creating air bubbles but before it's gone into an anaerobic state.

How much do I feed my starter?

You want to feed your starter in a ratio of at least 1:2:2 (1 part starter, 2 parts flour, 2 parts water). You can always feed it more than this. The more you feed it, the longer it will take for your starter to be ready to bake with or move to the fridge.

Basic feeding instructions

Feed your starter within 24 hours by moving to a 32 oz (900g) container and adding at least 4.2 oz (120g) of flour and 4.2 oz (120g) of lukewarm water.

Mix well until no dry bits of flour remain

Let rest at room temperature 4-6 hours, or until there’s noticeable activity and your starter is the consistency of a thick batter. If you tip the container, your starter should slowly pour like a batter and you should see the bubble and webbing that indicate aerobic activity (see video below). If you fed your starter more flour and water it may take longer for it to be ready to bake or move to the fridge. 

At this point, you can use your starter to bake or move it to the fridge for storage. When taking starter out of the fridge, you should discard all but 60g of your starter and feed following these instructions.

What am I looking for when I'm ready to make a recipe or move my starter to the fridge?

Your starter should have the consistency of a batter, which indicates that it's full of air bubbles.

If you tip the starter out of the container, it should pour like a thick batter, and you should see the "webbing" that's created when air bubbles are trapped in gluten structures. If you store your starter in a clear container, you should see mostly uniform bubbles throughout the container. 

Your starter should increase in size from when you fed it, due to the air bubbles, but it may not fully double in size. That's ok. If it floats in water, your starter is ready to bake or move to the fridge. 

What does it mean if my starter collapsed? 

If you reach into an active starter to take some, it will likely collapse. This is normal and ok.

If your starter fell without you disturbing it, this means the air bubbles collapsed, and your starter may have gone into an anaerobic state. Depending on how long it's been, you may still be able to bake with it (since you will be feeding it more flour and water when you mix it into your dough), though the final flavor and performance of your starter will change depending on where in its lifecycle you use it.

In general, if it's been less than 16 hours since your last feeding and your starter still floats or partially floats in water, you should have no issue baking with it.

Key do's and don'ts for maintaing your starter for years to come

Do feed your starter flours that contain gluten. While gluten-free starters do exist, ours was created with flour containing gluten and we can't guarantee it will adjust to a gluten-free environment. We use half whole wheat flour and half bread flour, which you should be able to find at most grocery stores. You can also feed your starter all purpose flour, or a blend of flours.

Do place your starter in a container at least twice the volume of the final fed amount of starter. Your starter won't always double in size when you feed it, but to avoid a mess, make sure to always give it plenty of room to expand.

Do keep your starter in an airtight container in the fridge when you're not actively feeding it.

Do keep your starter in a clear container so you can see its activity throughout the container.

 

Don't use all your starter in a single recipe! Always keep a small amount (1 tablespoon) to feed and maintain for future baking. 

Don't feed your starter hot or boiling water. Shocking your starter may kill the yeast and bacteria. 

Don't toss your starter if it's been in the back of your fridge. In all likelihood, your starter just went into anaerobic activity and created some alcohol. Drain off the liquid and toss all but a tablespoon. Feed it 120g of flour and 120 g of water. Check in it after 2-3 hours. If you see some bubbles, or if the mixture has started to get more loose, your starter is coming back to aerobic activity. Continue this feeding pattern two more times at 6 hour intervals, and your starter will be back and ready to bake with.

Sourdough scallion pancakes

1 pizza dough yields 4 scallion pancakes.

Rolled pancakes can be frozen and baked straight from the freezer! Remember to separate with parchment paper or wrap separately to prevent them from sticking together when frozen.


Ingredients


For the filling
1/4 cup flour
1/4 butter or alternative, melted
Pinch of salt
1 bunch of scallions, sliced thin

For the dipping sauce
Soy sauce (optional: add vinegar, garlic, a pinch of sugar)

Instructions

1. Let dough come to room temperature in its plastic packaging, at least one hour and up to 4 hours in colder temperatures. Your pre-shaped dough has been cold proofing, so it’s ready to stretch once it no longer feels cold to the touch. It won’t rise more until you bake it.

2. Use any flour to dust all sides of your dough, your hands, and your work surface. Cut your dough in to four equal portions.

3. Using a rolling pin, roll one portion of dough (using more flour as needed to prevent sticking) as thin as possible. It's ok if it's not a perfect shape, what's more important is to get the dough as uniformly thin as possible. It should be translucent if you hold it up to a light.

4. Add about two spoonfuls of the filling and spread with the back of the spoon to coat the dough.

5. Add as much scallion as desired distributing evenly on top of the pancake, then adding a little extra to the outer edges closest to you.

6. Tightly roll the dough, starting with the edge closest to you, until you have a cylinder of dough. Create a coil from the cylinder by holding one end of the cylinder and spiraling the rest of the dough around it.

7. Flour your coiled dough on all sides, then roll flat with a rolling pin until the dough is about the size of a small plate.

8. Repeat steps 2-7 for all portions of dough. You can stack floured pancakes on a plate until you're ready to cook them.

9. Preheat a pan to medium heat and add a thin layer of oil. Once the oil's heated (when it shimmers or when it sizzles if you flick some water on it), add a pancake to the pan and cook until the bottom is golden brown. Flip and cook on the other side until golden brown. Serve immediately with dipping sauce.

Videos